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title kinderorientation 

There are many skills that children need when commencing school.  The following list of skills are deemed necessary for children to have a positive experience in a regular Kindergarten situation.

PERSONAL

  • use toilet independently
  • dress and undress (jumper, hat, paint shirt, socks and shoes without tying laces)
  • tie shoelaces
  • identify and look after own belongings eg school bag, lunch box etc
  • separate from parents at school
  • open lunch box and pack bag
  • use handkerchief/tissue
  • know to/how to wash hands after toileting
  • put things away after use
  • eat independently
  • ask for help
  • walk up and down stairs safely
  • know the difference beyween 'lunch one' and 'lunch two'
  • understnad the dangers of traffic, electricity, fire, water, high places, strangers, medicine
  • handle small amounts of money for canteen spending- no more than $2
  • stay within the school/playground/classroom boundaries
  • good posture in seat
  • safely hold pencils and scissors
  • show responsibility for simple jobs
  • like to help with small household tasks

SOCIAL

  • share with peers/take turns
  • play with peers appropriately
  • participate in group activities
  • acceptable behaviour for school
  • show respect to teacher/adults and manners
  • share an adult's attention with other children
  • respect others' property and space/careful with others belongings
  • cope with changes in routine
  • independently greet and farewell staff and peers
  • aware of others feelings
  • appropriate attention seeking strategies
  • work beside other students, not insisting on 1:1 attention
  • respons to reinforcement/praise
  • realise that he/she cannot always win in a game situation
  • initiate own activity
  • skills to interact successfully with peers

COMMUNICATION

  • follow verbal instructions/directions (more than 1 step)
  • identify/recognise own name in print
  • express/indicate needs and wants
  • speak clearly
  • know/say own name
  • communicate with peers and teacher
  • aske and answer simple questions
  • listen to instructions
  • speak in complete sentences
  • listen to others speak in a group
  • eye contact
  • know address and phone number
  • know own sex
  • say age
  • know mother's and father's given names
  • answer/respond when spoken to
  • express experiences
  • explain how to do something
  • talk freely to adults/hold a conversation

ACADEMIC

  • hold pencil to make marks on paper
  • keep still for short period of time and listen
  • use scissors
  • write own name in lower case
  • listen to a story
  • know colours, shapes, sizes and numbers (orally)
  • adequate concentration span
  • awareness of why they are at school/keenness to learn
  • count to 10
  • show an interest in books
  • hold book and turn pages correctly
  • recite nursery fhymes/simple songs
  • be familiar with/use pencils, scissors, glue, paintbrushes
  • attempt drawings
  • accept correction/follow requests appropriately
  • understanding of rules and boundaries
  • cope with school routines (lining up, unch)
  • enjoy stories/poems/music/art and craft activities
  • know that there is a difference between letters and numerals
  • sustain a full day at school
  • complete a task (task to finish)
  • put up hand and not call out
  • discriminate between line drawings and written text
  • sit correctly on a chair at a table
  • trace over a picture/word/sentence
  • awareness of the purpose of books
  • colour a picture
  • count up to 3 objects
  • recongnise numbers 1-10
  • realise that mistakes are a part of the learning process
  • recite/be familiar with alphabet
  • identify well known animals
  • catch/throw a large ball, run, hop, jump
  • alternate feet walking down stairs
  • make predictions
  • double click and drag computer mouse
  • recall at least 3 objects from a group of 5
  • know the days of the week


Don't be surprised when you find that the little ones in Kindergarten are not taught all the formal prayers which older children and adults use.  There is a good reason for this, a reason which is psychologically sound.  A five year old should be allowed and helped to speak to God in a five year old way; parents particularly can do much to foster a love of informal prayer in little children.